Rent Control Battle in California and Beyond

“Certainly there is a housing shortage, so we need to be building housing, but what we are also seeking to address is the crisis of displacement…We’re seeing vulnerable communities — people of color, elderly folks, people with disabilities, single parents, low-income people and the middle class — being pushed out of California and becoming homeless.”

One of the hottest items on California’s November voting ballot is a rent control initiative called Proposition 10. The proposal intends to repeal a 23-year-old state law that tightly limits all forms of rent control within California. The desire for rent control in California has coincided with the rising cost of living throughout the state.

According to The Sacramento Bee, the nonpartisan Legislative Analyst’s Office (LAO) reports “Soaring housing costs have led to a net loss of 1 million citizens who have fled California from 2007 to 2016…and homelessness is higher here than any other place in the nation.”

Despite the widespread support from community groups like the AIDS Healthcare Foundation, California Teachers Association, California Nurses Association, and many others, the latest poll by the Public Policy Institute of California reports,

“A whopping 60 percent of likely voters say they will vote against Proposition 10, a measure on the Nov. 6 statewide ballot that would repeal the state Costa-Hawkins Rental Housing Act, which strictly limits rent control in cities across California. Repeal would restore broad authority to cities to enact any rent control law they choose.”

According to the LAO’s analysis of Proposition 10, the proposed repeals could result in more harm than good. LAO analysts warned of declined new rental construction, removal of units from the market, and the value of housing possibly dropping. Any of these factors would directly affect local government property tax revenue, which equates to ~$60 billion every year.  Furthermore, enacting new rent control laws would require millions of dollars per year to enforce, and result in a decline in income tax revenue, especially from the newly-affected property owners and investors.

It is important to consider how these restrictive laws and proposals affect citizens, property owners and investors, and a state’s overall economy. And while Proposition 10 is exclusive to California, and rent control laws vary from state to state, the negatives effects outlined in the LAO analysis showcases how impactful the ongoing battle of rent control is from a real estate professional, owner, or investor standpoint.

Click here to learn more about Proposition 10 and rent control.

“Like” us on Facebook at: www.Facebook.com/EPICamg

Subscribe for more blog posts, news updates, and more at www.EPICamg.com

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *