EPICamg

Posts

Rental Agreement

Eviction Ban Expires: What It Means For Renters and Owners

After numerous extensions over the last 12 months, the federal eviction ban expired this past weekend. With millions of Americans facing eviction and landlords looking to catch up on delinquency a wide variety of questions surrounding the expiring ban have been asked.

In a recent article from Multi-Housing News, author Jeffery Steele outlines how the expiring eviction ban will affect delinquent tenants and landlords moving forward. Some major takeaways include statements from both sides of the eviction ban debate. Gary M. Tenzer, principal & co-founder of real estate capital advisor George Smith Partners, told Multi-Housing News:

“While the moratorium has been beneficial to many (residents) who have been unable to work and pay rent during the COVID pandemic, it has imposed an undue hardship on landlords who must continue to pay the operating expenses and mortgage payments throughout the moratorium”

Tenzer continued his sentiment by point out another extension to the eviction moratorium would have resulted in an increased amount of loan defaults and “inevitable” foreclosures.

Another interesting point in the article was from a study conducted by a non-profit organization called The Aspen Institute. According to their study, 6.5 million American households are behind on their rent obligations. The average debt is in excess of $3,000. Across the U.S. renters owe approximately $20 billion to their landlords. More than 15 million people live in households with overdue rental payments.

Click here for the Multi-Housing News if you want to read it in its entirety.


“Like” us on Facebook at: www.Facebook.com/EPICamg

Subscribe for more blog posts, news updates, and more at www.EPICamg.com

Multifamily Market Shows Signs of Improvement

According to the National Multifamily Housing Council’s Quarterly Survey of Apartment Market Conditions for April 2021, the multifamily market is showing signs of improvement.

“We are finally seeing improvement in most markets around the country,” noted NMHC Chief Economist Mark Obrinsky. “While gateway metros are still generally facing lower occupancy and rent levels compared to a year ago, conditions now appear to be on an upward trajectory. On the other hand, many Sun Belt markets continue to see substantial rent growth and strength in fundamentals.”

The survey includes responses from over 100 CEO and other senior executives of apartment-related firms across the nation and tracks four indexes including Market Tightness, Sales Volume, Equity Financing, and Debt Financing. Results of the survey include:

  • The Market Tightness Index increased from 43 to 81, indicating tighter market conditions for the first time in six quarters. Two-thirds (67 percent) of respondents reported tighter market conditions than three months prior, compared to only 5 percent who reported looser conditions. Twenty-eight percent of respondents felt that conditions were no different from last quarter.
  • The Sales Volume Index increased from 53 to 77, marking the highest index level since October 2010. More than half (60 percent) of respondents reported higher sales volume than three months prior, while 31 percent deemed volume unchanged. Just 7 percent of respondents indicated lower sales volume from the previous quarter.
  • The Equity Financing Index increased from 58 to 68. While 42 percent of respondents reported that equity financing was more available than in the three months prior, a similar share of respondents (39 percent) believed equity financing conditions were unchanged during the same period. A smaller portion (6 percent) of respondents indicated equity financing was less available.
  • The Debt Financing Index decreased from 49 to 44. As the only index below the breakeven level, 23 percent of respondents reported better conditions for debt financing compared to three months prior, while 35 percent felt that financing conditions were worse. An additional 34 percent of respondents signaled that conditions were unchanged in the debt market.

Respondents were also asked if they were afforded any rent relief funding in their areas of operation. Almost half, 47 percent, reported successful accessing funds in at least some of their areas of operation, and only five percent in all areas of operations. About 25 percent of respondents claim they have not received any rent relief funding at this point. 16 percent of respondents reported receiving relief funding from local government or charitable organizations despite receiving zero federal funding. The last 11 percent of respondents signaled that they do not plan on accessing any federal rent relief.

Click here for the NMHC Quarterly Survey of Apartment Market Conditions for April 2021

“Like” us on Facebook at www.Facebook.com/EPICamg

Subscribe for more blog posts, news updates, and more at www.EPICamg.com

What Is the Great American Move?

For the past few decades, major metropolitans have experienced substantial real estate growth thanks to exciting nightlife, walkability, and strong job opportunity. But as COVID-19 continues longer than most would have expected, real estate pundits are noticing a shift trending toward lower-density, suburban areas and away from high-density locations. This change of heart and action by the market is being dubbed the ‘Great American Move’.

The pandemic is not the only driving factor behind the spike in migration to suburbs and smaller metropolitan cities. Before COVID-19, suburban locations were already attractive alternatives to major cities thanks to quality school systems, lower-cost housing for more space, and a stronger sense of community. In addition, thriving suburban areas have expanded to offer more desirable entertainment and nightlife options historically only found in metropolitan areas.

According to the Urban Land Institute’s (ULI) Emerging Trends Report, young, Millennial professionals starting families are major proponents in driving the ‘Great American Move’. The population in family formation years (aged 30-49) is expected to grow by 8.4 million people in the next decade. The report projects “this family segment to be a boon to the nearly 80 percent share of household growth that we expect will be captured by the suburbs in the years to come.”

COVID-19 has only accelerated the market’s shift in demand toward lower-density locations.  Trends like working from home (WFH) have provided residents unprecedented flexibility when deciding where to live. As a result, residents are capitalizing on the lack of a commute while their dollar goes further in terms of living space. An important trend to note as many real estate professionals expect the majority of businesses/companies to permanently implement at least partial WFH policies in the future.


Click here for the ULI Emerging Trends in Real Estate 2021 report

“Like” us on Facebook at www.Facebook.com/EPICamg

Subscribe for more blog posts, news updates, and more at www.EPICamg.com

Gathering Accurate Submarket Data

When property managers are analyzing the performance of their communities and the surrounding competition, it is absolutely vital to collect accurate data. But the value of submarket data varies from metric to metric. So, how do you know what information to value the most?

Metro market reports provided by industry leaders in research offers undeniable value in terms of summarizing how a market is performing. But any manager relying on submarket information provided by such reports would be acting as a major disservice to the property they manage. Ultimately,  the surefire way of understanding how your property is performing in its specific submarket is to analyze the performance of the competing properties in the immediate surrounding areas. And the only way to understand how your competition is performing is by conducting market surveys.

Metro reports are great for providing a snapshot summary of the overall economic and housing trend in any given market. This is great information for managers when making strategic, market-wide decisions, predicting where/when certain locations might become more desirable in the future, and how to position in order to capitalize on unexpected opportunities. However, the most indicative information comes from strong submarket analysis and knowing what to do or how to apply the information in a productive manner.

The reason metro market reports are not a good source of submarket data is due to how the surveys are produced and conducted. For the most part, only a handful of properties are directly contacted by the researchers. The amount of time, money, and effort it would take for researchers to contact every property in a certain state would be immense and overwhelming. So the picture of a market’s performance has to be painted with a broader brush. Consequently, the submarket data suffers and the information can become misleading.

So, if metro reports are only good for a more general snapshot of a market’s performance, how does one understand performance on a submarket level? In the end, market surveys are the most effective way of gaining specific information about a submarket and how a manager’s property compares.

However, market surveys come with their own hurdles while gathering pertinent information. Onsite employees are often already stretched too thin to obtain accurate information or they are not always trained in knowing what to look or ask for. Other property managers can refuse to provide metrics on their community’s performance or might even give false information.

One way to combat uncooperative operators is simply building a relationship on a personal level. Property managers in the same submarket working together can result in a better product for all through healthy competition, so sometimes a rising tide raises all ships.

Another effective method is using a secret shopper. Sending someone to shop apartments at a competing complex who knows what questions to ask and what information to look for can provide invaluable data that can be difficult to accurately obtain using other methods. While an operator might resist providing occupancy numbers or upcoming amenities to a competing manager, they could be much more likely to divulge that information to a prospective tenant.


“Like” us on Facebook at www.Facebook.com/EPICamg

Subscribe for more blog posts, news updates, and more at www.EPICamg.com

Emerging Opportunities During COVID-19

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues longer than any of us may have predicted, the real estate landscape continues to shift. Some housing trends increase in prominence and some come to a grinding halt, all while new, emerging opportunities for growth present themselves. One door opens as others close, so to speak.  For example, the millennial-led migration from cities to suburbs has only gained momentum. Conversely, multifamily developers and managers have shifted strategies to attract new residents by promoting health and wellness movements rather than property amenities.

“Times of great change always present significant opportunities,” said Urban Land Institute (ULI) Global CEO W. Ed Walter during the recent ULI virtual fall conference. “In the near term, our suburbs will benefit from new growth spurred by shifting demographics and changes to living and working patterns resulting from the COVID-19 crisis.”

Earlier this month ULI published its Emerging Trends in Real Estate 2021 report, referencing insight from over 1,500 leaders in the real estate industry. Some of the following trends are on the rise during the COVID-19 pandemic:

  1. Smaller office footprints
    • Online meeting services such as Zoom and GoToMeeting have made working from home (WFH) easier and more efficient than ever. Businesses are realizing they can cut costs by reducing their office footprint with employees working remotely. According to the report, over 90 percent of real estate professionals expect companies to adopt at least a part-time WFH policy.
  2. Suburban migration
    • As previously mentioned, suburban migration, especially among Millennials, was a popular trend before the pandemic. Now, the desire for low-density living is higher than ever. As a result, the south has seen a large influx of growth from movers longing for the greater housing affordability the region has to offer.
  3. Retail vacancy
    • Over 80 percent of ULI survey respondents believe the pandemic has only accelerated a shift in the retail sector that was already emerging due to online competition. For example, large department stores like Macy’s experienced disastrous sales in March after closing stores for almost two weeks and reportedly losing the “majority” of its sales.
  4. State/local fiscal issues
    • The loss of revenue across the board is expected to cause a wake of fiscal challenges for state and local communities over the next few years. Real taxes, the main source of revenue for local governments, will likely fall due to a drop as hotels and retail centers lose value. Furthermore, pandemic concerns create a snowball effect by encouraging consumers to shop online even more while actively avoiding spending money in-person at retail stores, restaurants, or other local businesses.
  5. Safety and sanitation concerns
    • If anything positive has resulted from COVID-19 it is health, safety, and sanitation practices. Businesses around the world are (re)enforcing sanitation practices by requiring customers to wear facemasks, providing free hand sanitizer at common contact locations in-store, limiting maximum occupancy, and implementing social distancing efforts where a line or queue may form.

Click here for the ULI Emerging Trends in Real Estate 2021 report

“Like” us on Facebook at www.Facebook.com/EPICamg

Subscribe for more blog posts, news updates, and more at www.EPICamg.com

Major Takeaways: Yardi Multifamily Report – October 2019

The extended period of good performance has produced one bad side effect: legislation enacted in three states to limit rent growth and pressure to act in more states. After a period of below-par growth in housing stock, the U.S. needs more units built, but rent control moves the needle in the opposite direction.

Earlier this week, Yardi Matrix issued its National Multifamily Report for October that highlighted supply and demand, rent growth trends, and political activity as we approached the end of Q4.

Yardi

 

According to the report, multifamily rent growth inched upward in October, as the average U.S. multifamily rent increased by $1 to $1,476. Year-over-year rent growth remained at 3.2%. Despite the expected slower month during the fourth quarter, Yardi expects continuous demand a slowly growing economy to keep rent growth above its long-term average.

The multifamily sector’s continuous strength over multiple years has resulted in an elevated number of rent-burdened households. In consequence, an increase in political pressure has yielded new rent control laws in three states: New York, California, and Oregon.

According to the Joint Center of Housing Studies at Harvard University, “More than 20 million renter households spend over 30% of income on housing, and 80% of renters and 63% of owners making less than $30,000 are cost-burdened.”

Yardi dubs rent control as counterproductive as it reduces investment, limits new development which perpetuates unaffordability, increases the cost burden on those who move or enter a new market, and reduces the incentive to make capital improvements which leads to degradation of already existing stock. Outlined affordability solutions include reducing exclusionary zoning, allowing more density, and more subsidized new developments.

Click here to view Yardi Matrix’s October Multifamily National Report in its entirety

“Like” us on Facebook at: www.Facebook.com/EPICamg

Subscribe for more blog posts, news updates, and more at www.EPICamg.com

Statewide Rent Control in California

The California legislature recently passed a bill called Assembly Bill 1842 designed to enact rent control and protect tenants. Despite its intended purpose, many believe the new law will be detrimental to tenants, owners, developers, and the national apartment industry.

California Statewide Rent Control

The new law, Tenant Protection Act of 2019, outlines a cap on annual rent increases at 5 percent plus inflation for any and all buildings 15 years or older, determined by the property’s initial certificate of occupancy. An estimated two million additional apartments are expected to be impacted by rent control as a result of Assembly Bill 1842 passing.

Other key provisions include:

  • Does not contain vacancy decontrol provisions, so units can return to market rent prices when vacated
  • Beginning January 1, 2020, requires landlords to have just cause in order to evict tenants
    for tenants who have occupied a unit for at least 12 months, or up to 24 months when an
    adult tenant adds onto a lease (change in roommates)
  • Requires landlords to provide relocation assistance via one month’s rent or rent waiver for no-fault evictions within 15 calendar days of serving notice, and to notify tenants of the relocation assistance.
  • Contains a 10-year sunset, so the requirements in the bill will expire in 2030.

See this California Rental Housing Association Rent Control Fact Sheet for more information on Assembly Bill 1482.


“Like” us on Facebook at: www.Facebook.com/EPICamg

“Follow” us on Twitter at: www.Twitter.com/EPICamg

Subscribe for more blog posts, news updates, and more at www.EPICamg.com

Top Markets for Occupancy Growth Through April – Yardi Matrix

Earlier this week, Multi-Housing News posted an article highlighting takeaways from a recent Yardi Matrix report pertaining to occupancy growth through the first quarter of 2019. According to the numbers, the nation’s average occupancy rate decreased by 20 points year-over-year through April to 95 percent.

Despite the step back on a national level, the five markets highlighted by Multi-Housing News are defying the odds and have emerged as frontrunners for occupancy growth through April 2019.

The occupancy growth in these markets can be accredited to beneficial market characteristics such as strong demographic trends, favorable business climates, modest development in surrounding areas, and steady employment gains.

Click here for the full Multi-Housing News article and additional Yardi Metrix statistics regarding the highlighted markets and occupancy growth.

“Like” us on Facebook at: www.Facebook.com/EPICamg

Subscribe for more blog posts, news updates, and more at www.EPICamg.com

Traders Confident of Interest Rate Cut in July

Last week, an unprecedented amount of traders in the fed funds futures market made bets with high expectations of an interest rate cut in the near future.  The high volume of trading came as no surprise as many traders had already expressed confidence in the first quarter that a rate cut was coming. Their confidence only increased after the post-Federal Open Market Committee statement and forecasting materials pointed to a possible rate cut in the coming months.

According to CNBC’s Jeff Cox, “The market now sees a 100% chance of a rate cut at the July 30-31 meeting, up from 85% a week ago and just 15% a month ago. For the full year, the expectation for three cuts is 66% up from 59% a week ago and a mere 4% last month. ”

The record-setting volume of trading was fetched at the end of the week after the central bank concluded its two-day policy meetings. The week’s volume was tracked above 3.5 million contracts, easily topping the best week ever in May 2018 at 1.19 million contracts.

Click here to read the Traders This Week Bet on a Fed Rate Cut in Record-Setting Numbers article in its entirety 

 

“Like” us on Facebook at: www.Facebook.com/EPICamg

Subscribe for more blog posts, news updates, and more at www.EPICamg.com

Multifamily in 2019

Despite some reservations before the start of the year, multifamily real estate performed well in 2018. But as we look toward the beginning of the new year, it would prudent of investors and owners to prepare for as the market is expected to shift in a different direction.

Earlier this week, Karlin Conklin, a value-add multifamily expert with a transactional volume exceeding $1.3 billion, outlined three primary factors that could shift the multifamily market in the upcoming year including “pressure from volatile financial markets, a growing housing supply, and emerging development risks.”

Interest Rates And Multifamily

With the economy cruising at a comfortable level, The Federal Reserve has had their foot on the break throughout 2018. It raised the federal funds rate to a 2 percent to 2.25 percent during its November meeting, making it the third rate increase of 2018. A fourth and final increase is expected to come during the Fed’s December meeting. But how will this affect multifamily real estate in the coming months?b1da3076093b404ea90f5996c18540df.jpgAccording to Conklin, debt pricing “looms as the largest multifamily market mover in the coming year… And more so than any other investment, real estate class, or multifamily asset, pricing is tied to debt pricing.” Overall, as borrowing becomes more expensive, the more cap rates will have to be adjusted; and as a result, Conklin sees 2019 as more of a buyer’s market with acquisitions being motivated by assets that are “right priced” to account for rising interest rates.

Supply or Demand?

Throughout 2018, operating dynamics were favorable for multifamily real estate. The combination of increasing rents and high occupancies often resulted in operating expense surpluses. Although, that sweet spot did not last forever. In fact, the industry has started to see a decline in demand, and many markets are now over-supplied. Conklin uses Seattle and Boston has prime examples. Over the last five years, the two markets had “red-hot rent growth” and attracted plenty of developers to capitalize on the high demand and low supply.

Fast forward to November 2018. Seattle and Boston are now pushing through multifamily deliveries that ” put the brakes on rent growth to levels between 0% and 1.5% on a year-over-year Q3-2018 basis, according to Zillow. That compares with annualized rent increases from 2015 to 2017 near 7% in Seattle and 5% in Boston and Nashville.”

In summary, it’s important for investors, owners, and developers to realize how new deliveries are, and will, impact asset values in their current and prospective markets as demand and supply begin to invert.

Development Risks

Beyond the macroeconomic factors that consistently dictate multifamily trends, variables such as trade tariffs, labor shortages, and local government regulation will shape the path for multifamily real estate’s near future.

On a national level, trade tariffs on materials such as steel, lumber, and electronic components have bumped the cost of construction line items by more than 10 percent year-over-year. There has been a specific labor shortage in the construction sector due to a rise in labor costs. The National Association of Home Builders reported in a recent survey that 69% of its members were experiencing delays in completing projects on time due to a shortage of qualified workers, while other jobs were lost altogether.

Post-recession rent growth has put housing affordability in the spotlight, and local governments in some markets are responding with affordable set-aside mandates and rent control proposals. For example, many cities in California have seen the number of citizens vying for citywide rent control vastly increase. Fortunately for multifamily investors and professionals, rent control propositions in California have generally been unsuccessful.

Overall, Conklin still sees opportunities for new construction and renovation in 2019, but with a thinner margin of error.

—–

Click Here if you’d like to read Karlin Conklin’s article in its entirety.

“Like” us on Facebook at: www.Facebook.com/EPICamg

Subscribe for more blog posts, news updates, and more at www.EPICamg.com